School me on AN fittings, update

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I'm installing an MKR pump (identical to Emtes) to replace the previous scavenging pump. Previous pump used a banjo bolt, this one requires an 6AN fitting. My idea is to cut off the banjo bolt fitting on the rubber hose and place a 6AN female. Instructions say the pump needs to be facing 3 o'clock, but I see someone else has done 9 o'clock here with an Emtes pump (and I don't see what difference it would make either way since I they are identical pumps, the inlet remains the same). I sent a message to the seller, waiting for a reply.


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In place, I think I'll need a 90 degree elbow to clear the exhaust.

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I'd like to just run new braided hose, but I'm having a helluva time trying to find information on how to install banjo fittings onto hoses. The stock one utilizes crimped banjo connectors and I'm not finding too much information on installing those either. Most of the ones are I see have threads.

This is the other end of that hose, connected to the sump via another banjo fitting.

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Can I install AN fittings onto non-braided rubber hose? If I can't (or shouldn't reuse old non-braided hose), it looks like this is the type of AN fitting I'm looking for. Then the question becomes - will the banjo bolt that fits the sump also work with this banjo fitting?

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I would attach above fitting to the fitting circled in red below?


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And as far as installing, these things are simply pushed onto the open end of the connector and then locked into the place by 2nd half of the "nut" that is unscrewed and put onto the hose prior (circled in blue above)?

And I don't need any special tools, correct? I see they sell vice jaws, but it looks like it's just to prevent scratching the piece.

Thanks in advance.
 
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I cant see why you couldn't turn the pump head, except their logo wouldn't be straight.
Only one way to find out, take those three screws out and look behind it.

You can use regular hose if it's a thick enough wall thickness.
And yes the vice jaws and special wrenches are to keep from scratching the anodize. You can just put tape on regular wrenches and hold it with wood in your vise.

And as far as installing, these things are simply pushed onto the open end of the connector and then locked into the place by 2nd half of the "nut" that is unscrewed and put onto the hose prior (circled in blue above)?
Yes. And make sure the braided hose doesn't poke the hell outta you.
I usually cut the shit with tin snips, shove it in the fitting and hope it doesn't fray like hell. Some people wrap tape around the cut end, but I have found it doesn't really help that much.
 

maui

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it's unlikely that an AN fitting will thread on to that line. Buy line and fittings from one supplier. It won't break the bank but its not cheap either.

Avoid mixing brands as much as possible. Its not that they can't mix, but that they sometimes dont work well with others. I buy most of my stuff from Summit. You can get stuff on amazon (pictured) thats really cheap, comes from china, sometimes the shit works..sometimes not. Honestly even the Summit (brand) is most likely Chinese but at least they have quality control.

If you need to have steel braided line, go with a quality provider, Earls, Russel, etc for example. Steel holds up better to fire and somewhat better to abrasion. If those are not actively part of the environment, maybe you dont need it. If you can get away with some of the black braided line (picutred) its about 5x easier to assemble and has (generally) good fitment. If you are dead set on steel braid, you'll be stabbing your fingers endlessly and never really getting it done. Assembling lines takes a little practice and technique. When you're done you will not be able to pull it apart if you did it right, and you should try to pull it apart.

there are special tools that make this easier. I pretty much have all that stuff, however I've made up more lines then I can remember with a good bench vice and cresent wrench.

Pro tip, before cutting the line, wrap the to be cut with either glass tape or duct tape. Cutting it is better with a 4" cut off wheel but a hack saw will work (sorta). Do this BEFORE you cut the line to length. Cut in the middle of the tape so that the remnant piece has a taped end too. Wrap it tightly. Leave the tape on when you assemble the fittings. The fitting should cover the tape so you won't see it if that really matters. If a little is showing you can remove it when you are done.

If you mix and match brands, it may work, it may not. If not doesn't, you may have an oil leak which on a turbo bike could result in fire or loss of engine or control.

dont fuck around.
 
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I use Earl's fittings and the black nylon braided hose. Much easier to work with than stainless braided. Wrap the fittings with duct tape to keep from tearing them up. I also have a pair of plastic vise jaw covers. I got them at a Mopar swap meet for like $4.

I would not use those fittings on rubber hose.
 
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I'd probably hard line that...3/8" aluminum tube.
Cheaper, more compact and doesn't destroy everything it rubs against.
People always had miles of braided hoses on their racecars, I'd use as little as I could possibly get away with.
 
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I cant see why you couldn't turn the pump head, except their logo wouldn't be straight.
Yep, seller confirmed 9 o clock is fine. So I'll use a 90 degree elbow.

Steel holds up better to fire and somewhat better to abrasion. If those are not actively part of the environment, maybe you dont need it. If you can get away with some of the black braided line (picutred) its about 5x easier to assemble and has (generally) good fitment.
Noted, I'll buy quality fittings. Nylon should be fine since plain rubber worked before.

I'd probably hard line that...3/8" aluminum tube.
Cheaper, more compact and doesn't destroy everything it rubs against.
People always had miles of braided hoses on their racecars, I'd use as little as I could possibly get away with.
I like this idea too. I'll need to shorten the hard fuel line on the truck, so might as well get used to it now.

I've read that there is no flaring needed for fitting AN on a hard line, just the brass ferrule (also see it referred to as olive or sleeve) between the threaded female "nut" and threaded male piece. Is that the case?

I see elsewhere people using a flare tool to do a 37 degree flare....is that for connecting an AN fitting to an NPT fitting?
 
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I've read that there is no flaring needed for fitting AN on a hard line, just the brass ferrule (also see it referred to as olive or sleeve) between the threaded female "nut" and threaded male piece. Is that the case?

I see elsewhere people using a flare tool to do a 37 degree flare....is that for connecting an AN fitting to an NPT fitting?
Yes you still need to flare the tube to 37 degrees.
And no there is no brass.......the ferrule and tube nut are gonna be aluminum .
Brass hardware store and automotive flare fittings look kinda like AN fittings but they are 45 degrees.
And regular 45 degree stuff works just as well, you just can't mix and match.
 

Your Car Is Slow

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def no ferrule in an an fitting, its not a compression fitting but a "fitment" fitting where the faces of each end come together perfectly at that 37deg angle etc.

oddly enough overtightening an an fitting will fuck it up and ensure it leaks!
 
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There isn't a hose shop near you? Anybody that does Gates Weatherhead or Aeroquip industrial or aircraft hoses could make you up a nice one with crimped steel ends...easy peasy.
Great tip. Called a local place, they said we have both fittings you're looking for and can make it while I wait. Perfect.

Yes you still need to flare the tube to 37 degrees.
And no there is no brass.......the ferrule and tube nut are gonna be aluminum .
Okay. So if I understand correctly with a hard line, I'll flare to 37 degrees regardless of fitting.

If it's AN to AN, it uses a tube sleeve pictured above since it's not a "compression" fitting.

If it's AN to tube, it uses the ferrule, because the tube fitting is considered a compression fitting and requires an adapter, such as the one below.

Do I have that correct?

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No...you don't use brass in an aircraft line system. That is an adapter fitting.
That copper ferrule you posted is usually seen used with copper or plastic line.

The ferrule does the sealing in non AN.....the tube does the sealing in AN.
 

LE05BUSA

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I would rather have steel braid or aramid/fiber braid than hardline, just because of vibration and possibly striking things. Save the hardline for frame mounted automotive brake lines and Hardly-Ablesons.
 
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Thanks for the advice everyone. The local shop was pretty helpful - their supply of fittings was immense. They ended up selling me a barbed 90 6AN fitting to hoseclamp onto the old hose - I doublechecked that that was kosher and they said it's good for 300 psi, and this is for an oil line, so I'll be well below that.

Getting the crankshaft/starter clutch bolt torqued to 55lbs without turning the starter was tricky. The tool I needed was $50 and would take a couple weeks from England, so I just made it out of a plate and some bolts for a few bucks. Janky, but it worked.

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Just have to prime the sump and the pump and should be good to go.

19 gal fuel cell came in and found a truck toolbox, so that'll be next for the k10. I'll need to get a 37 degree flaring tool and I'm going to run braided hose until it meets the hard fuel line mounted inside of the frame. I'll have the hose shop make that up. Way easier :up:
 

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The oil line from the sump to the pump is a suction line, not pressure line.

I found a stash of duz fasteners for the fairing. Two sizes. Pm me your mailing address and I'll send them.
 

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