People just don't want to hear the truth...

   #4  

CZLoco

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Whoever suspended him is about as stupid as the person who created this meme.

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   #8  

CZLoco

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Really enjoyed this meme :up:
I'm honestly not sure from which perspective you enjoyed it though.
I don't mean that in a bad way.
I still like people that I disagree with politically.
You just didn't clarify though.
 
   #9  
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I'm honestly not sure from which perspective you enjoyed it though.
I don't mean that in a bad way.
I still like people that I disagree with politically.
You just didn't clarify though.
The way the meme was intended: rather than overhauling the overly profit driven and costly education system, "just have people join the military service" is a pretty ridiculous argument to be against improvements.
 
   #10  

hagrid

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The way the meme was intended: rather than overhauling the overly profit driven and costly education system, "just have people join the military service" is a pretty ridiculous argument to be against improvements.
The solution is simple: force institutes of higher learning to charge less for tuition.
 
   #11  

CZLoco

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Those people bitching about their student loans need to consider these points.

1) It costs a lot to ensure the best teachers remain in the USA to teach your stoopid ass.

2) You should have worked harder in High School to ensure your grades would get you a scholarship.

3) You were told up front the loans need to be repaid. So why didn't you just get a real job first and save up for a few years. I mean it's not like the Military people were going to school full time during their time in the service.

4) So many more points to make.
 
   #14  
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1) It costs a lot to ensure the best teachers remain in the USA to teach your stoopid ass.
Yet colleges pay very well for ancillary staff as well, that have nothing to do with educating students, not to mention construction costs for that shiny new building, a small army to fundraise, research, etc.

2) You should have worked harder in High School to ensure your grades would get you a scholarship.
But if you didn't work hard in HS, then you really wouldn't care about college, right? You could still do very well in HS, but there is only a finite amount of scholarships to compete against other students for.

3) So why didn't you just get a real job first and save up for a few years.
If people could do that, they wouldn't bother going to college in the first place, right? A lot of them do require a college degree, even for idiotic office jobs.

All I'm saying is if someone wants to educate themselves, we should be changing the system to make it more accessible, not maintaining barriers. An educated populace benefits everyone, not just themselves and employers. Not too many people with a 4 year degree go around mugging people at knifepoint. Not to mention, having students that don't have crippling debt to start out in life would be a big boost for the economy.
 
   #15  

Austin_F

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So the guy gives an honest answer to a complaint. If he had blown the guy off I could see escalating it.

So then this guy goes and gets the guy suspended which could possibly end up with the guy unemployed?

Fucking assholes are never satisfied. I worked in food service long ago and as anyone else knows, you QUICKLY realize the general public are assholes and/or idiots.
 
   #16  
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So the guy gives an honest answer to a complaint. If he had blown the guy off I could see escalating it.

So then this guy goes and gets the guy suspended which could possibly end up with the guy unemployed?

Fucking assholes are never satisfied. I worked in food service long ago and as anyone else knows, you QUICKLY realize the general public are assholes and/or idiots.
Everyone should be forced into a 6 month retail or food service job.

You learn to hate society real fucking quick.
 
   #19  

Terry_Schiavo

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I remember people joining the military for the GI benefit then realizing they might be deployed... hilarious!
Guessing they kind of glossed over a few things like the UMCJ and the expectation of service.
I certainly wouldnt go into debt for college. Its not like youre going to be any less competitive for a position. Toting a note around is just plain foolish IMHO. Especially when there are 100s of available scholarships and grants or companies that allow part time workers to get medical, retirement, tuition reimbursment, etc.
 
   #21  
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it's apparent to me everyday I have to drive :up:
Oh man, try explaining to some entitled Karen bitch why you can't honor her expired $1 coupon from 3 months ago.

Or scanning items for some old fucking person as the line backs up full of impatient people and then they whip out a check book to write a goddamn check like it isn't the 21st goddamn century where you can swipe a piece of plastic in 3 seconds...and then they fuck that check up and have to rewrite....and then they said forget it and instead to use cash....digging around the bottom of their purse or wallet for that last penny....

When I retire, I'm going to get a part time job at Taco Bell so I can eat free while on the clock and yell at stupid fucks in the drive thru.
 
   #23  

nomad

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Fag News is not exactly a good source for anything, but in this case, I wonder why this is a surprise?

Americans do not want to hear that the party ended decades ago, that their lifestyle is supported by printing money and trading on the dominance of the world oil currency

What makes you think they give a damn about the truth of this minor pimple?
 
   #24  

CID

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All I'm saying is if someone wants to educate themselves, we should be changing the system to make it more accessible, not maintaining barriers
Why?

The system "barriers" in life weed out idiots and from my point of view it's only the idiots that can't pay their bills.

Sounds like the usual "everybody needs to go to school to get a job or do well in life" mentality which is a total crock of shit.




8 Frightening and Funny Libertarian Stereotypes
 
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   #25  

Rhino

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Those people bitching about their student loans need to consider these points.

1) It costs a lot to ensure the best teachers remain in the USA to teach your stoopid ass.

2) You should have worked harder in High School to ensure your grades would get you a scholarship.

3) You were told up front the loans need to be repaid. So why didn't you just get a real job first and save up for a few years. I mean it's not like the Military people were going to school full time during their time in the service.

4) So many more points to make.

I agree


I think the problem is free education from grades 1 through 12 ...

So when the 12 grader graduated HS they just expect college to be free as well.. get rid of free education in place of the CHILD TAX and no one will expect anything to be free
 
   #26  
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The system "barriers" in life weed out idiots and from my point of view it's only the idiots that can't pay their bills.
Hardly. Plenty of idiots at all levels of society to go around. And being unable to pay bills has less to do with intelligence and more to do with money in your bank account. Lots of leveraged people with well paying jobs that are 1 or 2 paychecks away from filing for bankruptcy.

Like I said, if someone wants to climb up out of their circumstances to improve themselves, I'd like to see society do a little more to help them out by way of reducing education costs. It benefits everyone.

Sounds like the usual "everybody needs to go to school to get a job or do well in life" mentality which is a total crock of shit.
Yep, for certain labor markets that's completely true. Trades is a big one. Sales is another. But depending on your career path, a degree is 100% a requirement to entry.
 
   #27  

Terry_Schiavo

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When I retire, I'm going to get a part time job at Taco Bell so I can eat free while on the clock and yell at stupid fucks in the drive thru.
see this is why my life is so much happier. I dont do drive thrus or convenience stores so I never see the dipshit set. It takes all of 2 mins to preplan your day to avoid such silliness. Im the same way about lines for eating establishments. Aint no place that good Im waiting in line for some scavones to finish. :fu:
One thing I took away from living in a major metro area with over 15,000,000... the early bird gets the worm. Also the late sleepers...lol
 
   #28  

CID

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I'd like to see society do a little more to help them out by way of reducing education costs. It benefits everyone.
A little more 'how" exactly?

I know you support a national healthcare 'for all' system where the government pays the bills through taxes.

Do you feel the same way about an individual's college education as well?

What about those of us that don't go to college, have kids in school or spend too much time in the healthcare system --- how much do 'they' pay in taxes, as that share or is education just an insurance for all system too?

Or... maybe you think we should cap the costs by not allowing anybody to charge more than a certain amount for any of these services?
 
   #29  

Austin_F

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The checks are pretty bad. instead of prewriting the date. Store, signing it,etc. They stand there with their hands folded smiling sweetly until you give them the total. THEN, and only then, do they set their purse on the counter and begin digging for their checkbook.

The old guys are the same. Wait until the total, then reach into their back pocket. Next thing you know their slowly peeling off $1 Bills and handing them to you like they're $100 bills.

Another old people thing is accusing you of overcharging them. And they do it with a "aha, gotcha!" Attitude. Until you painstakingly break down the pricing and the taxes. Then its 'oh well, not a big deal I was just wondering'.

Man. I gotta stop now, my agent orange acting up just thinking about it.
 
   #30  

ysr_racer

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The checks are pretty bad. instead of prewriting the date. Store, signing it,etc. They stand there with their hands folded smiling sweetly until you give them the total. THEN, and only then, do they set their purse on the counter and begin digging for their checkbook.

The old guys are the same. Wait until the total, then reach into their back pocket. Next thing you know their slowly peeling off $1 Bills and handing them to you like they're $100 bills.

Another old people thing is accusing you of overcharging them. And they do it with a "aha, gotcha!" Attitude. Until you painstakingly break down the pricing and the taxes. Then its 'oh well, not a big deal I was just wondering'.

Man. I gotta stop now, my agent orange acting up just thinking about it.
My favorite is when old Jewish guys say, is that pesos or American money (and think it's funny).
 
   #31  

whitepower

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Anal Disco said:
I'd like to see society do a little more to help them out by way of reducing education costs. It benefits everyone.

In Bridgeport CT the city tore down 2 of the 3 public highschools and invested tens of millions into all new state of the art (they look better than the Trump tower) buildings, football, baseball, soccer fields. 70 million for one and a proposed 60+ million for another.

I drive by Harding Highschool almost daily, there is always at least 10 police cars present when school goes in and out.
Regardless how much money they throw at the problem, ghetto children will never get higher learning.
It has to start at the family level.

The next town over is Stratford. I've lived in Stratford since 1982 and went thru the school system there from 8th grade till 12th. When i went to Bunnell HS there were a total of maybe 6-8 black kids in the whole school. Stratford was considered a white town.

Fast forward to today. Bunnell HS is mostly black, or at least it seems like it is. Drive by when school gets out and 75% of the kids are colored.

Initially, you would think that Bridgeport blacks moved into Stratford because the black population outgrew Bridgeport, however that is not so.

Talk to Stratford black kids and you quickly realise that they are well educated kids. None are axing anyone, none are talking ebonics.
What is happening is black families are taking the initiative and moving away from the bad black cities in order for their kids to grow up better educated...and it's working

The problem starts at home. Those who want better for their family move away from the welfare cities.
Those who stay in the ghettos and send their kids to shiny new schools face the same problems as always...bad entourage bad rolemodels and no matter how much they invest in the school system, the end product is the same.
 
   #33  
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Anal Disco said:
I'd like to see society do a little more to help them out by way of reducing education costs. It benefits everyone.

In Bridgeport CT the city tore down 2 of the 3 public highschools and invested tens of millions into all new state of the art (they look better than the Trump tower) buildings, football, baseball, soccer fields. 70 million for one and a proposed 60+ million for another.

I drive by Harding Highschool almost daily, there is always at least 10 police cars present when school goes in and out.
Regardless how much money they throw at the problem, ghetto children will never get higher learning.
It has to start at the family level.

The next town over is Stratford. I've lived in Stratford since 1982 and went thru the school system there from 8th grade till 12th. When i went to Bunnell HS there were a total of maybe 6-8 black kids in the whole school. Stratford was considered a white town.

Fast forward to today. Bunnell HS is mostly black, or at least it seems like it is. Drive by when school gets out and 75% of the kids are colored.

Initially, you would think that Bridgeport blacks moved into Stratford because the black population outgrew Bridgeport, however that is not so.

Talk to Stratford black kids and you quickly realise that they are well educated kids. None are axing anyone, none are talking ebonics.
What is happening is black families are taking the initiative and moving away from the bad black cities in order for their kids to grow up better educated...and it's working

The problem starts at home. Those who want better for their family move away from the welfare cities.
Those who stay in the ghettos and send their kids to shiny new schools face the same problems as always...bad entourage bad rolemodels and no matter how much they invest in the school system, the end product is the same.
I agree with everything stated here.

It does start at the home, but school has just as much an impact as well. Ask anyone here who had decent parents but raised hell in HS growing up...your peer group are going to shape a lot of your beliefs and values...if you hang around ghetto trash, you're making life 10x harder for yourself and you're right - shiny new building matters 0. I'd argue that a smaller class size is much more effective at overcoming group mentality than 1 teacher trying to control a class of 30 kids.

In this particular case, the cost of higher education isn't the primary barrier to graduating seniors - it's that they have no interest in doing so. Again, peer groups - if none of your friends care about college, then you're not likely to either - free or not. Not much to do from that standpoint.
 
   #34  

CID

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What is happening is black families are taking the initiative and moving away from the bad black cities in order for their kids to grow up better educated...and it's working
How do you suppose these families are making this initiative move happen?

Most people won't or can't move without resource to do it and that's the entire excuse low income/ crime-hood lockin happens. Are Bunnell housing prices now more affordable or what?
 
   #35  

whitepower

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The black families making the move are obviously holding better jobs and making efforts for their families.
My parents moved to Stfd although they didn t have a pot to piss in, but they made sacrifices, worked overtime on weekends in order to offer their kids more.

These are sacrifices that not every household is willing to make. Housing is considerably higher in Stfd than in Bpt.
 
   #36  

Vegas12

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Whoever suspended him is about as stupid as the person who created this meme.

View attachment 22193
Agree 100% with you, Eddie.

Asshole is suggesting every job in the military is infantry, special forces or other potentially dangerous specialty.

There are 100's ++++ jobs available where you'd never see the threat of combat.

It's just another lame ass excuse.

My nephew is 1/2 way to his bachelor's 100% on his own dime....first 2 years in community college and finishing up with a local university.

So his diploma won't say "Harvard," BFD.

I wonder if "free" higher education ever came to be if the educator's income would be dictated by the government......like the doctors against universal/single payer healthcare, the professors would have a meltdown.

The county school district here tried to lay off some 6 figure dean's positions so that the teachers could get a raise....it was comical watching the dean's heads explode during the meetings.
 
   #37  

whitepower

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I agree with everything stated here.

It does start at the home, but school has just as much an impact as well. Ask anyone here who had decent parents but raised hell in HS growing up...your peer group are going to shape a lot of your beliefs and values...if you hang around ghetto trash, you're making life 10x harder for yourself and you're right - shiny new building matters 0. I'd argue that a smaller class size is much more effective at overcoming group mentality than 1 teacher trying to control a class of 30 kids.

In this particular case, the cost of higher education isn't the primary barrier to graduating seniors - it's that they have no interest in doing so. Again, peer groups - if none of your friends care about college, then you're not likely to either - free or not. Not much to do from that standpoint.
It's up to the individual, ultimatelly... I know plenty well off families that offered their kids the best private schools and their kids ended up fuckups.
I know kids that went through shit ghetto public schools and got scholarships in college.

The school means less, the guiding of parents and home life means more to the forming of one s ideas and character.
Rarely do you find kids turning out ok coming from fuckup families, although i know a couple cases.
 
   #38  
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rumble phish

rumble phish

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At some point parents must be willing to make serious personal sacrifices in order for their children to gain advantages that maybe the parents never had. At the same time, parents must also be willing to teach their children hard lessons so that they can build their tool box to deal with life.

In this day and age of instant gratification and "what about me" attitudes the above scenario is playing out fewer and fewer times, to the unfortunate detriment of the following generations.











Parenting ain't for pussies.
 
   #39  

ysr_racer

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My parents, Gomez and Mortica did a fine job with my idiot bother. Just look at the result :)
 
   #41  
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A little more 'how" exactly?

I know you support a national healthcare 'for all' system where the government pays the bills through taxes.

Do you feel the same way about an individual's college education as well?

What about those of us that don't go to college, have kids in school or spend too much time in the healthcare system --- how much do 'they' pay in taxes, as that share or is education just an insurance for all system too?

Or... maybe you think we should cap the costs by not allowing anybody to charge more than a certain amount for any of these services?
The US already spends the trillions on healthcare - we spend the most on Earth - yet our healthcare outcomes are somewhere in the middle of the pack. This is due to the bloated and inefficient healthcare system already in place. If we're already spending the money for substandard results, why not streamline it? One study for Medicare for all found that it would save money over the next few decades, while improving outcomes. One thing it would certainly help is small business to compete against big business - where big corps can offer a better healthcare package, small business cannot - health insurance would be a big reduction in cost while being able to attract better talent.

I'm leaning against "free public college for all" - I think it would end up having the opposite effect in that colleges would have to be more selective in accepting their applicants which would make it more likely to accept the students that are less likely to need financial aid and thus pushing out the students that do. Very counter-intuitive, but there it is. Read one article that when education subsidies were decreased in 2008, rather than forcing colleges to cut cost and run "leaner", they ended up taking more foreign and out of state students (where they can charge triple) and pursuing a wealthier class of applicants - thus screwing over in-state and lower income students. Another article stated that Pell Grants don't have a limit to borrow - just up to whatever the school charges per year on tuition - it's obvious that the incentive there is to increase the cost of tuition as much as possible to soak up all those loan dollars. What do they care? Free money for them. There is no incentive to decrease costs when the government teat is flowing. Should college be free? No. Should costs be decreased so as to be affordable without sacrificing accessibility? Yes.
 
   #42  

ysr_racer

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The US already spends the trillions on healthcare - we spend the most on Earth - yet our healthcare outcomes are somewhere in the middle of the pack. This is due to the bloated and inefficient healthcare system already in place. If we're already spending the money for substandard results, why not streamline it? One study for Medicare for all found that it would save money over the next few decades, while improving outcomes. One thing it would certainly help is small business to compete against big business - where big corps can offer a better healthcare package, small business cannot - health insurance would be a big reduction in cost while being able to attract better talent.

I'm leaning against "free public college for all" - I think it would end up having the opposite effect in that colleges would have to be more selective in accepting their applicants which would make it more likely to accept the students that are less likely to need financial aid and thus pushing out the students that do. Very counter-intuitive, but there it is. Read one article that when education subsidies were decreased in 2008, rather than forcing colleges to cut cost and run "leaner", they ended up taking more foreign and out of state students (where they can charge triple) and pursuing a wealthier class of applicants - thus screwing over in-state and lower income students. Another article stated that Pell Grants don't have a limit to borrow - just up to whatever the school charges per year on tuition - it's obvious that the incentive there is to increase the cost of tuition as much as possible to soak up all those loan dollars. What do they care? Free money for them. There is no incentive to decrease costs when the government teat is flowing. Should college be free? No. Should costs be decreased so as to be affordable without sacrificing accessibility? Yes.
tl;dr

Cliff's Notes?
 
   #43  

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If the US gov stopped giving money to Israel and the rest of the world...because we literally give money to lots of countries, they could certainly invest that into education.

However you missed the memo where... The US gov wants stupid people. Stupid people don t ask questions. They eat what is fed to them and ask for seconds.
In most euro countries, it's students who score high that get to go to state paid college. It ain t free to every idiot
 
   #45  

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   #46  
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Because those private insurance plans where people are spending $250 a month aren't worth the paper they're written on. The chart doesn't go into whether those private plans are subsidized by an employer.

My previous plan under Cobra coverage post employment was $650 a month! I've bought OOP plans (not subsidized by an employer) and they were cheap, but the deductibles were outrageous and it really only covered you for catastrophic events. That was at least $200 a month.
 
   #47  

CID

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The chart doesn't go into whether those private plans are subsidized by an employer.
understood -- I changed up the graphic to no longer show "per month" but per year which regardless of employer subsidized or not is the average costs 'per person', which is the entire basis of 'pooling' insurance and calculating expenditures.

I hear a lot about how medicare will be cheaper for all... but NOBODY can say how much my tax to PAY for it will be... which I would assume to be high given that I pay the fuck out my checks for it NOW and can't even use it.

Because those private insurance plans where people are spending $250 a month aren't worth the paper they're written on.
That's an interesting statement -- my insurance is about $137 more than that $250 lowest number from the earlier graphic I posted --- is that not worth the paper either or is there a monthly "worth" that drops off?

Do you suppose that the place you live in was the reason your cobra was so high or does/should that not matter as far as pooling insurance goes?

btw.. reason I bring this up as compared to school is that on one hand you think that concerning government education for all, there would be shortcomings in service, yet for healthcare you seem to think it would be ok, so I find that kind of ironic. Anyway, don't get into these "what could" as far as "what it is" -- cause nobody really knows. If somebody could guarantee me a cost price -- like when I 'ask' for insurance they tell me "it will cost this"... and I get to pay or not then. ...well then I'd be all for a nationalized plan. But this whole "projection" thing....? ......nah fuck that. Not while I'm paying taxes anyway. When I get up to Z's age, then I'll be all for it! :lol::up:
 
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   #49  
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understood -- I changed up the graphic to no longer show "per month" but per year which regardless of employer subsidized or not is the average costs 'per person', which is the entire basis of 'pooling' insurance and calculating expenditures.

I hear a lot about how medicare will be cheaper for all... but NOBODY can say how much my tax to PAY for it will be... which I would assume to be high given that I pay the fuck out my checks for it NOW and can't even use it.
Theoretically, the government would absorb the insurance business side of pooling resources so you wouldn't see the difference. Remember, when you pay for your insurance premium, you're already paying for all the other people that don't have insurance and use the ER like a fucking walk-in clinic...the hospital just sticks it to the insurance company to help offset the non-paying people, that's why hospitals charge a cash rate vs an insurance rate. If you've ever seen an itemized hospital bill, it's retarded. $10-15/pill for Tylenol, yikes, and the insurance company will happily "pay" it because they profit handsomely.


That's an interesting statement -- my insurance is about $137 more than that $250 lowest number from the earlier graphic I posted --- is that not worth the paper either or is there a monthly "worth" that drops off?
I'm assuming you're employed by someone - if so, how much is your employer covering. If you have a great health plan that you're paying under $400 for AND it's entirely self-funded, then hang onto it, because I'm assuming you're happy with the coverage for a 'reasonable' cost.

Self-pay plans for $250 aren't going to cover very much, have a sky high deductible and you'll be responsible for a significant portion after the coverage is met. One thing I'll say for Trump, I'm glad he got rid of the mandate that punished for not having an ACA compliant plan.


Do you suppose that the place you live in was the reason your cobra was so high or does/should that not matter as far as pooling insurance goes?
No, as I was most recently employed through a national recruiting agency - they had pretty reasonable insurance that only cost me $30-40/week. COBRA, which I opted for last week, is going to run in the $450 range a month through United HealthCare. My prior agency charged me around $100/week for BC/BS and COBRA coverage was $700+ a month, so I had to go through an insurance broker to get cheaper 'catastrophic' insurance...many of the absolute cheapest plans were pretty useless.

That being said, I've read that even though you're paying 100% of the cost (plus a 2% fee) out of pocket for the COBRA coverage, it's still cheaper than to find the identical plan with identical coverages/deductible/copay with the same company, likely because your employer was able to get a better rate and that's where the actuaries crunch their numbers to determine insurance premiums based on # of employees, nature of industry, length of coverage, etc. etc.



btw.. reason I bring this up as compared to school is that on one hand you think that concerning government education for all, there would be shortcomings in service, yet for healthcare you seem to think it would be ok, so I find that kind of ironic.
I was going to touch upon the difference in my last post but it was getting long, but here it is - the biggest difference is that the healthcare system is already being utilized by folks, regardless of whether they are able to pay. As in, whether or not you have health insurance, you're going to end up at the hospital if you need to. You won't go to the Dr's office for a persistent cold if you lack insurance, but you'll go to the ER if you think you're having a heart attack - you may not call an ambulance (:lol:) but you'll get your ass in there quick. Definitely heard of a few stories of people with active chest pain drive themselves.

So let's say everyone has comprehensive health insurance tomorrow - there's not going to be a run on the hospital. Sure, walk-in clinics will see a sharp uptick in the wait rooms and Dr's offices will find themselves with more patients, but I'm not concerned about health care rationing and certainly not about the so-called "Death Panels" that National Review raved about at one point. This uptick is a good thing - I firmly believe that if people came in earlier with health issues, they would be able to be treated before it became serious enough to warrant an ER admission. Seen that a bunch too - people who skipped important doctors appointments or didn't refill their scripts because they didn't have the insurance to do so and found themselves jammed up as a result.

Now whereas the healthcare system is able to absorb having a nation of people with insurance coverage, I don't think the same of higher education system and 'free college'. You can build a walk-in clinic in 90 days (they are popping up everywhere and are more common than a Dunkin Donuts or McDonalds), but you can't do the same with a college. If college became free tomorrow, applications everywhere would spike and I'd guess that all institutions, even community colleges, would have to be a bit more selective in allowing students in for a finite number of seats until they can build expansions, but that could take years so in the end, the person that is least likely to get a seat is the same person this system was designed to help the most.
 
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ysr_racer

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Theoretically, the government would absorb the insurance business side of pooling resources so you wouldn't see the difference. Remember, when you pay for your insurance premium, you're already paying for all the other people that don't have insurance and use the ER like a fucking walk-in clinic...the hospital just sticks it to the insurance company to help offset the non-paying people, that's why hospitals charge a cash rate vs an insurance rate. If you've ever seen an itemized hospital bill, it's retarded. $10-15/pill for Tylenol, yikes, and the insurance company will happily "pay" it because they profit handsomely.




I'm assuming you're employed by someone - if so, how much is your employer covering. If you have a great health plan that you're paying under $400 for AND it's entirely self-funded, then hang onto it, because I'm assuming you're happy with the coverage for a 'reasonable' cost.

Self-pay plans for $250 aren't going to cover very much, have a sky high deductible and you'll be responsible for a significant portion after the coverage is met. One thing I'll say for Trump, I'm glad he got rid of the mandate that punished for not having an ACA compliant plan.




No, as I was most recently employed through a national recruiting agency - they had pretty reasonable insurance that only cost me $30-40/week. COBRA, which I opted for last week, is going to run in the $450 range a month through United HealthCare. My prior agency charged me around $100/week for BC/BS and COBRA coverage was $700+ a month, so I had to go through an insurance broker to get cheaper 'catastrophic' insurance...many of the absolute cheapest plans were pretty useless.

That being said, I've read that even though you're paying 100% of the cost (plus a 2% fee) out of pocket for the COBRA coverage, it's still cheaper than to find the identical plan with identical coverages/deductible/copay with the same company, likely because your employer was able to get a better rate and that's where the actuaries crunch their numbers to determine insurance premiums based on # of employees, nature of industry, length of coverage, etc. etc.





I was going to touch upon the difference in my last post but it was getting long, but here it is - the biggest difference is that the healthcare system is already being utilized by folks, regardless of whether they are able to pay. As in, whether or not you have health insurance, you're going to end up at the hospital if you need to. You won't go to the Dr's office for a persistent cold if you lack insurance, but you'll go to the ER if you think you're having a heart attack - you may not call an ambulance (:lol:) but you'll get your ass in there quick. Definitely heard of a few stories of people with active chest pain drive themselves.

So let's say everyone has comprehensive health insurance tomorrow - there's not going to be a run on the hospital. Sure, walk-in clinics will see a sharp uptick in the wait rooms and Dr's offices will find themselves with more patients, but I'm not concerned about health care rationing and certainly not about the so-called "Death Panels" that National Review raved about at one point. This uptick is a good thing - I firmly believe that if people came in earlier with health issues, they would be able to be treated before it became serious enough to warrant an ER admission. Seen that a bunch too - people who skipped important doctors appointments or didn't refill their scripts because they didn't have the insurance to do so and found themselves jammed up as a result.

Now whereas the healthcare system is able to absorb having a nation of people with insurance coverage, I don't think the same of higher education system and 'free college'. You can build a walk-in clinic in 90 days (they are popping up everywhere and are more common than a Dunkin Donuts or McDonalds), but you can't do the same with a college. If college became free tomorrow, applications everywhere would spike and I'd guess that all institutions, even community colleges, would have to be a bit more selective in allowing students in for a finite number of seats until they can build expansions, but that could take years so in the end, the person that is least likely to get a seat is the same person this system was designed to help the most.
Holy crap, are you getting paid by the word?
 
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