one motorcycle riding skill you want to improve

maui

Big Bore diggidy mayhem
Joined
Dec 12, 2001
Messages
35,211
Location
see above
riding more is more of a scheduling skill then riding skill, and if you haven't figured that one out yet you're probably not going to.

I work on stuff like being smoother, calmer on the brakes, stuff like that. More recently where I'm looking and when, which is also a timing issue. It's all track skills but thats not to say there aren't some street riding skills to work on.

The subject of rear braking has been coming up for the last few months. It was very coincidental that Stu posted his rear brake thread. While the answers were all over the place, it was super helpful.
 
Last edited:
OP
maui

maui

Big Bore diggidy mayhem
Joined
Dec 12, 2001
Messages
35,211
Location
see above
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
+1 on smoothness. Smoothness is speed 😎

(In the car, I practice smooth on and off gas, smooth on and off brakes.)
One thing I have become fairly confident in is that being around other more accomplished riders is how you make ground...riding with Stuman is smooth as demonstrated, and explained. You need to have input from people who can actually see what you're doing and then (the truly difficult part) is if they can relate it to you.
 
OP
maui

maui

Big Bore diggidy mayhem
Joined
Dec 12, 2001
Messages
35,211
Location
see above
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
While there is overlap this question might yield very different answers for track vs street
street riding is much more limited in what you can accomplish as skill wise with out having ridicules consequences for your efforts. I gave up on trying to become a better street rider outside of reducing risk buy not being (as) stupid. I also don't ride very much on the street any more. I cut out group riding pretty much completely as it is just a testosterone/ego battle.
 

NORTY

BAMF
Joined
May 5, 2003
Messages
3,740
Location
Not disclosed (anymore, so F-off.)
street riding is much more limited in what you can accomplish as skill wise with out having ridicules consequences for your efforts. I gave up on trying to become a better street rider outside of reducing risk buy not being (as) stupid. I also don't ride very much on the street any more. I cut out group riding pretty much completely as it is just a testosterone/ego battle.
Don’t confuse “better street rider” with “faster track rider.”
The street and the track, are 2 different skill sets.
The faster a track rider is, the larger that difference becomes.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
OP
maui

maui

Big Bore diggidy mayhem
Joined
Dec 12, 2001
Messages
35,211
Location
see above
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
Don’t confuse “better street rider” with “faster track rider.”
The street and the track, are 2 different skill sets.
The faster a track rider is, the larger that difference becomes.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
why would the difference become greater between the two if you improve in either?
 

CZLoco

artist formerly known as quad destroyer and...
Joined
Dec 13, 2001
Messages
31,834
Location
TX
The fast stuff - which really just means track days.
It's been on my mind lately and I'm already thinking ahead to spring.

Also will be looking for some rashed up, crap plastics for 05/06 GSXR1000 for sale.
 

CZLoco

artist formerly known as quad destroyer and...
Joined
Dec 13, 2001
Messages
31,834
Location
TX
Being smoother, and it's something I've worked on for years. It's easier on the bikes, and me 😀
What, you don't want to be one of those guys with the super animated elbow action when they get on the throttle? :D
 

Kirk

BAMF
Joined
Dec 30, 2001
Messages
7,965
Location
Deep in the heart of Texas
One of the most entertaining and least smooth racers I ever saw, was Mitchell Pierce. He grabbed giant handfuls of throttle exiting Portland's turn 9 onto the 3/4 mile long front straight.

This was a Seattle video of intentional shenanigans intentionally filmed with a tire that was already torched, but his actual racing looked a lot like this:



There's no way he was paying for his own tires, riding like that.

Jake Holden was almost as aggressive. His sister was an umbrella girl for him, his sister was friends with SV Hottie, and they invited us to Laguna Seca for SV Hottie and his sister to be umbrella girls for him.

And John Dugan, who sponsored DV Hottie's race bike with a HOK (House Of Kolor) paint job, was also pretty aggressive with the throttle.
 

gsxrian

BAMF
Joined
Feb 23, 2005
Messages
4,416
Always wanted to learn (or have the balls) to put a knee down while cornering.
Easy,
do some stretch exercises,
borrow a ysr50,
bottom out the suspension,
put it on its kick stand,
put on your fancy new leathers,
with nice shiny knee pucks (double up to start, if you cant quite make it),
have someone hold the bike,
assume the position,
BOOM you have dragged a knee
:)

118460

1669291865229.png
 

agri

BAMF
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
8,260
Location
Ex Madawaska Now Toronto
I always recommend people ride dirt bikes before street riding.
You get used to a bike moving around and different traction conditions, this experience helps big time on the street in an emergency.
That being said as mentioned here, smooth inputs and every once in awhile test your abs out with some panic stops in a parking lot.
If your used to abs kicking in when you do have to stop fast it will help.
 
OP
maui

maui

Big Bore diggidy mayhem
Joined
Dec 12, 2001
Messages
35,211
Location
see above
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #34
Always wanted to learn (or have the balls) to put a knee down while cornering.
This is a great goal. It's clear, achievable, and most likely within your ability, so realistic.

apology in advance for being too long.

Getting your knee down while considered the goal by a lot of street riders, is more of a result. I clearly remember the first time my knee touched the ground, it was a right turn on a small bridge, I was on my Hayabusa, I had no idea what happened, I didn't even have knee sliders on my suit. I was glad I had a suit though. And bad habits, yes I was rolling deep in them...

Theres so much to unpack on this, I'm sure Stu has dealt with every iteration possible teaching people this "skill". Street riding usually doesn't involve coaching but its happens. The challenge is that the people doing the coaching often don't have the skill of coaching or the base from which to coach, two different things. Skill meaning knowing how to teach, the base meaning what to teach.

Not all but certainly a lot of riders, reach for the ground (with their knee) trying to touch, fucking up basically everything in the turn. I see a lot of riders at trackdays, who are twisting themselves up to try and reach the ground and as a result they have very poor control and end up sacrificing a lot of safety. Think about that, sacrificing safety to make a mistake. Who in their right mind does that? I see those same riders sometimes working with coaches, explaining to the coach that the reason they do what they do, is because they are street riders.

It's always amazing to me when a rider coach will stick around after that. Yes, the coach knows they have bad habits, what often happens after that, is the student then goes out and continues to practice the bad habits and is surprised that they are stuck in improving, but since their knee is on the ground they pat them selves on the back, and the coach rolls their eyes, waisting the coaches time, who could have been working with someone who actually wants to improve.

Learning how to learn should be the first thing any school teaches a student. Learning how to learn is the first responsibility of a student. It's an entirely different subject but it's relevant because if you want skills, they have to come from somewhere. I'm not going to mince words or be very kind, but when a student tells the teacher why they as the student are wrong, they are time stealers. I've worked with some incredibly gifted individuals and what they largely had in common what they knew how to learn. When you get a good coach, LISTEN TO THEM.

The Teacher already knows the student is wrong, the student is justifying to the teacher the bad habit they have, which is why they are time stealers. I know a bunch of coaches/teachers not only in motorcycling but in 30 years of martial arts who listen to this theft of time. I was one of the teachers who had to listen to this. Here's something the students probably don't realize, that most all the teachers they know, talk to each other about that student. Yes we talk about you. It's done as a warning to other teachers that the student is either dense, unwilling, even arrogant, and the coach should be prepared to not be effective, or to even simply not engage the time stealer.

back to knee dragging..or feeling the ground.

If you could spend a a day or three with a quality instructor like Stu, or one of the many really good racer schools, who would roll you back to basics like learning how to actually turn a motorcycle, how far you can lean, your knee might actually touch the ground naturally. It's not so much having the balls to touch your knee, but having the balls to lean your bike. Bikes almost always have so much more room to lean then we think. If I had to put a number to it I would say most street riders are using less then 50% of what the bike can do.

Improve your cornering skills first. Put your tires exactly where you want them to be 100% of the time. Draw a line with your eyes back from the apex to a point in the road you are going to be at. You can't target fixate, this all happens in an instant then the reference points change and you do it again. On top of that you have to look where you want to go while looking at where you are. Circle back to being smooth, and all of this becomes safer, faster, and smooth.
 

Ninjaman12R

Joe Rogan, I smoke rocks....🖕
Joined
Dec 30, 2001
Messages
7,131
Location
Dyersburg, TN
Improve your cornering skills first. Put your tires exactly where you want them to be 100% of the time. Draw a line with your eyes back from the apex to a point in the road you are going to be at.
Great advice! A lot of the old backroads I run have been neglected for years, the pavement is rough, and in some spots broken up. Some of the curves still have a good line through them for a bike, but you have to exercise inch perfect riding to do it. What you described above is exactly what method I use.👍
 

Qwik

High Altitude BAMF
Joined
Jan 1, 2002
Messages
37,295
Location
is highly variable.
Website
www.LABusas.org
Great advice! A lot of the old backroads I run have been neglected for years, the pavement is rough, and in some spots broken up. Some of the curves still have a good line through them for a bike, but you have to exercise inch perfect riding to do it. What you described above is exactly what method I use.👍
My last track day I spent the entire day trying to hit my lines within an inch. By the end of the day I was doing pretty damn good
 
OP
maui

maui

Big Bore diggidy mayhem
Joined
Dec 12, 2001
Messages
35,211
Location
see above
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #38
My last track day I spent the entire day trying to hit my lines within an inch. By the end of the day I was doing pretty damn good
It’s also helpful to know how to plan a turn. Simplify hitting the apex at the mid point is usually wrong.
 

Kirk

BAMF
Joined
Dec 30, 2001
Messages
7,965
Location
Deep in the heart of Texas
It’s also helpful to know how to plan a turn. Simplify hitting the apex at the mid point is usually wrong.
Amen.

When I started to learn how to actually ride, a lot of the things that Code says, became relevant to me. Steering for the throttle. Quick steering. One steering motion. Not "charging" corners with a low entry. Planning for the exit of the corner.
 

Snail

BAMF. No. Really. As BAMF as they get.
Joined
Jan 25, 2002
Messages
23,666
Location
Oregon
Walk it off was Dr.Tinheads advice, I went with that. It took a month to walk it off but it's fine now.
 
OP
maui

maui

Big Bore diggidy mayhem
Joined
Dec 12, 2001
Messages
35,211
Location
see above
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #49
The problem I'm working on for dirt riding is to learn how not to fall down. Every time I crash it hurts big.
not crashing...theres 6 basic principles, though I'm sure someone will come along and tell me I'm wrong. In no particular order:

lack or focus or a plan, nothing to tie your technique to.
abrupt input
rushing your direction change
repeating a mistake
over confidence.
lightning strikes..or sometimes shit just happens

I've found it pretty rare to only have one of the following present when reconstructing a crash but it happens. Probably the lightning strike which is often beyond your skill set....which is why it's a crash not a save.
 

rumble phish

BAMF+
Joined
Mar 31, 2002
Messages
16,990
Location
Modesto, CA
not crashing...theres 6 basic principles, though I'm sure someone will come along and tell me I'm wrong. In no particular order:

lack or focus or a plan, nothing to tie your technique to.
abrupt input
rushing your direction change
repeating a mistake
over confidence.
lightning strikes..or sometimes shit just happens

I've found it pretty rare to only have one of the following present when reconstructing a crash but it happens. Probably the lightning strike which is often beyond your skill set....which is why it's a crash not a save.
I think my crash at Sonoma (or Infineon, or Sears Point, or whatever it's called these days) was strictly a matter of overconfidence. After coming off my best exit of the day out of t11, I went in too hot on tires that were at their limits of use and paid the price.
 
Top Bottom