How many people here are college educated?

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GSXRTURBO1

GSXRTURBO1

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Another interesting question for those without a degree is, do you regret not getting one and do you think you would have been better off if you got a degree?


For me, I don't regret not getting one as I have done pretty well without it. But I wonder if a degree might have given me a head start or sent me down another path.
I regret it. I have a good job, but feel I would have gone much further with a degree. That said, I've worked with quite a number of people with a degree who have been let go, especially in the last 3 years.
 
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I wanted to be a car mechanic when I was in high school. My Dad (who had been either a carpenter or mechanic his whole life) tried to talk me into going to medical school. He said doctors get to bury their mistakes, mechanics have go fix them until they get it right.

I should have listened.

I started on cars, went to agricultural equipment, then construction equipment, then material handling equipment, then industrial maintenance, and finally
automation. I get to work on cars for a hobby now.
 

ysr_racer

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I wish I had graduated. Not because of the extra money it may have brought me, but because I admire people that were able to stick it out, I wasn't.

I admire smart people, I'm not.

I met a guy working at the Griffith Observatory. I asked him a simple question about the "thing that swings and knocks down pegs" and 20 minutes later I was more confused than before.
 

bowtie

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I graduated HS barely as well .. I never studied, ever, always had motorcycles to ride or girls to chase, or cars to hotrod .. my parents tried pushing into Chiropractic school among other things, I ended up at CU for a couple years before giving up and working .. I ran a Buffalo ranch in Colorado for several years before coming to Texas and graduating D.P. Academy and testing for a slot, that didn't suit me either .. I've been a tile contractor since '95, started building homes recently.
 

RollieFree

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College or University?
If you’re asking me where I got mine, it was a university. Big shit. I work at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, AZ. I try very hard every day to teach my students skills and understanding that I have learned in 30 years of working. They get more than a text book education from me. I see to it. It’s how it should be. I love them and that’s how trust and experience gets passed down. They come back and see me and tell me how silly stories about how I raised my kids, troubles I had selecting wrong filler rods, how and when to suspect annealing metal soft spots, how to pay off your debts faster, how to recognize cutting speed and feed things…all the shit universities don’t teach. I am passing along everything I know. That’s the best thing I can do.
RF
 

RollieFree

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I don’t only teach. I teach 2 days per week. I teach machining, welding and sheet metal shaping. The other days I fabricate stuff I build all kinds of stuff. Crazy stuff. Rockets and airplanes all day. Once fabricated a mechanical pelican. It could soar and cruise with real pelicans right past your naval station security without notice while loaded with state of the art spy gear. Still looked and acted like a pelican. Crazy shit.
RF
 

Wretch

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Wouldn't want to hit your metal bird while riding! :eek:
I don't want to hit any bird while riding.

My Father took out a dove at 90mph on his Z1b and it left quite a bruise on his chest and nearly took him off the bike.
Amazing that it didn't crack his sternum or break some ribs.

I've been lucky enough to dodge the birds that have been hell bent on suicide.
 

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My buddy Rex took one to the front fairing of his BMW at fairly high speed. I saw him drop back and then pull off to the side of the road so I turned around and went back. We were out north of Death Valley. Whatever bird he hit it was a very direct hit. No damage but it splatted like a bug. Blood all over his bike, and him. It was kind of hilarious.
I hit a chipmunk and wanted to turn around and go back to make sure the poor little guy was dead. BillyV comes up with a mist of blood droplets on his bike and face shield and told me there was no need to check. Said he exploded.
 

LE05BUSA

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I took a crow to the face shield doing about 60, back when i lived in L.A., that was a stunning experience. A couple years ago, here, I ran over a cat coming home from work. It darted out from some bushes, in between the wheels. It was a mild speed bump for me, life ending experience for the cat.
 

r1racer

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If you’re asking me where I got mine, it was a university. Big shit. I work at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, AZ. I try very hard every day to teach my students skills and understanding that I have learned in 30 years of working. They get more than a text book education from me. I see to it. It’s how it should be. I love them and that’s how trust and experience gets passed down. They come back and see me and tell me how silly stories about how I raised my kids, troubles I had selecting wrong filler rods, how and when to suspect annealing metal soft spots, how to pay off your debts faster, how to recognize cutting speed and feed things…all the shit universities don’t teach. I am passing along everything I know. That’s the best thing I can do.
RF
want'd to do Embry Riddle in FL post HS.... thought hard bout West Point Academy too.... parents push'd different direction....

87220


#NoRegrets
 
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Was just asking because (at least here) there was (and is still? Who knows?) a sort of class system they made it sound like university was the peak... those who couldn't get in went to college and those who couldn't get into college went to trades school/ "technical college"... at least that's how it was marketed in Canada during high school.

Also I remember a desperate push for every kid to immediately get a student loan and go to one of those 3 things... looking back on it - it was clearly marketing and they were most definitely leveraging the most vulnerable... directly into debt.
 
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I specifically remember them bringing in people to talk to everyone in grade 12 to tell everyone to get a loan and how to do it. They gave everyone kits to take home to their parents. Day one of university was a big orientation with tables all sponsored by credit card companies. They gave me a visa card at their big "orientation day". Zero income. Nothing to back it. I ran it up buying booze and junk food and never paid it. I can't imagine it was any different for anyone else. Just a way to shackle you into debt the second you left high school. If they didn't get you with the student loan then the multiple "free" credit cards sealed the deal for them.
 

luckystrike

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Another interesting question for those without a degree is, do you regret not getting one and do you think you would have been better off if you got a degree?


For me, I don't regret not getting one as I have done pretty well without it. But I wonder if a degree might have given me a head start or sent me down another path.
I think you work in tech, so I’d say it would’ve made it easier to get to where you are

At the end of the day, the one thing a degree of some sort tells people more than anything is you’re able to sit down and finish something
 

RollieFree

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I worked full time, my wife worked full time, we raised a child and both graduated with degrees and zero debt.
I don’t know if that’s possible anymore. It’s very expensive these days. I routinely see kids leaving with $200k of loans. I spent $300k for my two, ran out of money and had to borrow… and still owe a grand a month for 5 more years.
RF
 

Stuman

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I think you work in tech, so I’d say it would’ve made it easier to get to where you are
Yes I work in tech, I'm currently a Product Engineer (another way of saying technical sales) for a custom software development company. I don't think I would be where I am today if I had pursued a degree. I most likely would have been set on a different path. I don't think a degree would have made it any easier to succeed given the path I took.

My path was pretty random. I've always had an interest in technology, but I didn't really study it in school. I did take several electronics classes in high school, but nothing involving computers. I think if had I pursued a degree it would have probably been as an electrical engineer that would have been more in-line with what I studied in school. Had I done that I probably would not have ended up in software.

I was an electrician for a few years after high school, but the work dried up and a friend of a friend had an open position in computer operations and I took it. I started as a third shift systems operator back in 1990. I worked my way up through several positions at a couple of companies. I was fortunate to be an early employee at a company that grew like crazy pre Y2K and went public. I was granted a bunch of options and after working there for 9 years I retired and went to work full time for the Superbike School for the next 8 years. Then after getting bored at the superbike school I went back into tech and ended up where I am now.

It's interesting. I spent about 4 years as an electrician after high school. About the time it would have taken to get a degree. In that time I learned that hard work is rewarded and you can work your way up. I started as an apprentice, advanced to a journeymen, and headed up a crew after a few years. I advanced because I showed up on time every day, worked hard and took every opportunity to lean my trade.

When I started as a systems operator it was a very menial job. All I had to do was back up the system, print reports and distribute them. While the system was being backed up I had nothing to do for about 5 hours. At the time, the system (an HP3000), had an on-line study course called Help Study that could be accessed while the backup was going. I ran through the entire course in a couple months. This basically qualified me to become a systems manager. So in this position I showed up on time every day, worked hard and took the opportunity to learn my trade. Something I learned in those four years after high school.
 

luckystrike

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Yes I work in tech, I'm currently a Product Engineer (another way of saying technical sales) for a custom software development company. I don't think I would be where I am today if I had pursued a degree. I most likely would have been set on a different path. I don't think a degree would have made it any easier to succeed given the path I took.

My path was pretty random. I've always had an interest in technology, but I didn't really study it in school. I did take several electronics classes in high school, but nothing involving computers. I think if had I pursued a degree it would have probably been as an electrical engineer that would have been more in-line with what I studied in school. Had I done that I probably would not have ended up in software.

I was an electrician for a few years after high school, but the work dried up and a friend of a friend had an open position in computer operations and I took it. I started as a third shift systems operator back in 1990. I worked my way up through several positions at a couple of companies. I was fortunate to be an early employee at a company that grew like crazy pre Y2K and went public. I was granted a bunch of options and after working there for 9 years I retired and went to work full time for the Superbike School for the next 8 years. Then after getting bored at the superbike school I went back into tech and ended up where I am now.

It's interesting. I spent about 4 years as an electrician after high school. About the time it would have taken to get a degree. In that time I learned that hard work is rewarded and you can work your way up. I started as an apprentice, advanced to a journeymen, and headed up a crew after a few years. I advanced because I showed up on time every day, worked hard and took every opportunity to lean my trade.

When I started as a systems operator it was a very menial job. All I had to do was back up the system, print reports and distribute them. While the system was being backed up I had nothing to do for about 5 hours. At the time, the system (an HP3000), had an on-line study course called Help Study that could be accessed while the backup was going. I ran through the entire course in a couple months. This basically qualified me to become a systems manager. So in this position I showed up on time every day, worked hard and took the opportunity to learn my trade. Something I learned in those four years after high school.
"I think if had I pursued a degree it would have probably been as an electrical engineer that would have been more in-line with what I studied in school. Had I done that I probably would not have ended up in software."

Just an observation in my own personal sphere...just about every EE grad that I know ended up being a software developer

Hardware is very difficult, and other than Apple and that tier, very low margin and is instantly ripped off by even lower margin operators

There's just so much more money in software than...just about everything else because of the huge margins
 
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