Anyone know what this thing is? YOU FUCKERS ARE GETTING CLOSE*

chandler

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Re: Anyone know what this thing is? LABUSAS IS STILL STUMPED*

nah... its soldered (looks like it at the center)... that couldnt be for any high temp duty...
Gas welded sans filler. Notice the deformation on a few corners. Failed QC?
 
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FastGixx

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Re: Anyone know what this thing is? LABUSAS IS STILL STUMPED*

You're a bad motherfucker fredd :up:

That has to be about as close as we've been to figuring out what this thing is.
 

Lota Fun

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Thanks for that fredd.


I'm pretty damn sure that is not soldered, that is TIG welded. :up:
 

BilletMan

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Definitely related to a burner...the central fixture is very much reliant and related to the radially arranged features....It's a burner...:up:
 

BilletMan

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It just so happens that I have THE MOST INTERESTING PISTON ENGINE in the whole world, RIGHT HERE! And it has a Marquardt sticker on it! I'm gonna HAVE to post up pics of this thing!

You'll freak when you figure out/learn why it was designed and built! :eek: :eek: :eek:
 

Wretch

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Re: Anyone know what this thing is? LABUSAS IS STUMPED*

I do recall some early turbine engine exhaust having a single similar shape
as one of the smaller outer tubes only larger on the DeHavilin Comets?

Maybe a Vickers jet or early version on the Boeing 707?

Not sure how this thing could be related unless someone was building a giant scale model.

The attached wood makes me think it's either for display as whatever it is or it is a tool...
...maybe for holding/turning the Gatlin gun barrels.

So which turbine engine had the funky exhaust cone shape like the ten outer tubes like on this thing?
I was sure it was a British passenger jet but damned if I can remember which one.
 

fredd

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I am certainly not a photo analyst. :cool:

But there are some interesting guesses that we should be able to make by looking at the photos:

1) Notice the wear on the outside half of the cylinders. I don't see any indications of lateral or vertical wear. My guess is that this mystery item is inserted into and then held in place by some kind of carrier.

2) Notice that there does not appear to be any wear on either the inside or outside of the fluted pieces except as noted above.

3) There is no evidence of any burning inside the fluted pieces.



4) The high points on both the fluted pieces and the center pizza pieces both appear to have some wear contact.

5) The bottom of the cylinders (as seen in the MAE 213 photo) may have a flare at the bottom, for the possible purpose of seating something in the cylinder.

6) I am guessing that the cylinders are made up of two pieces.


Hope this helps to jog someone's brain into an active state. :D

 

fredd

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...and my Uncle Bill weighs in...

Who knows what that thing is! I very much liked the guess that it was some general’s ash tray. Your friend from Wyoming clearly has some “domain expertise”, as we call it, and might be close. I particularly resonated with his observation about the material. It looks like high-class stainless steel to me and must have been quite expensive to fabricate. Seems to be made to withstand high pressures and/or temperatures. One thing that stood out for me was the shape of the “satellite” cylinders. They seem designed to form a shape with a high surface/volume ratio, which is what one wants for solid propellants. I wondered if it was a device either to hold or to extrude solid propellants. Having said that, I’m not any more certain of that guess than I would be about the ash tray.

Sorry not to be more helpful. Do let me know when/if someone gets it right.
 
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fredd

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I think he may be on to something...

Imagine your solid propellant being like giant piece of playdough.

The mystery device is then pressed down or the playdough up (remember our wear contact points on the top of the device?) in order to extrude the material.

The flares at the bottom of the cylinders helping guide the propellant into the cylinders.

In this scenario all of the various shapes, including the pizza slices, make sense.

And the spacing between the cylinders would appear to be correct.

The only thing keeping me from going all in on this theory is that the rocket expert from WY is one of best in the business re: solid propellant manufacturing.

So...are we getting hot?
 
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Solid propellant would not be shaped like that.

AT least when working with Ammonium Perchlorate (AP) based fuels one uses pretty simple shapes in the core of the fuel grain. You want a nice even burn, you dont want the chance that chunks would break away, rattle around in the combustion chamber, break more pieces off and cause an overpressure in your motor casing. The more surface area you have (from chunks coming loose) the faster it burns and the more pressure you generate. To do this in an uncontrolled manner can lead to overpressure and casing failure. In other words... KABOOM!!!!!

The core of most AP fuel grains have a simple round hole, or if you want a very fast burn, a star shape.

This would extrude fuel grains with the shape on the outside... also not good. You use the unburned fuel to insulate the motor liner and outer case of the motor from the heat and pressure of the combustion chamber. These would burn outside in, not inside out.

I've never seen a commercially available fuel grain with this shape.

here is a pic of a commercial modern high powered rocketry motor. The 5 slugs with the red stripes on them are the AP fuel grains. They burn from the inside, and ends of the grains, out... For those that shot off rockets when they were kids and the BIG motor was an Estes D12 (thats a black powder motor and burns much slower and is much less powerful than AP)... well this one is a K670 motor.

 
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fredd

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Choptop - Wickman seems to agree with you.

It definitely would not be used to hold solid propellants in a motor as the heat from the propellant would easily melt the metal. As for extruding propellant, the fixture is all wrong. I have seen old extruding tools and they look nothing like that. Solid propellants stopped being extruded in the 1950's and are now cast into the motor.

What really makes me think the device is a flame holder is the v-shape of the metal spokes going out from the center. This is a classic flame holder shape. The outer tubes I believe were to create a series of air jets around the main combustor flame and also provide additional air cooling of the combustor outer walls. The crimped in ends of the tubes would have accelerated the air to improve cooling and focus the air.

John
 
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A K motor will get most things moving pretty well!!
depending on the formulation of the motor and the size of the rocket, some K motors can get things moving along nicely. The last K I launched pulled over 50G's off the pad and put a 3 inch diameter, 6 foot tall, 15 lb rocket up over 15k feet. :D

fun stuff.
 
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FastGixx

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Hahahha. It's the fucking kanooter valve off dolans y2k:D
 
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FastGixx

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Seriously.. you guys are working hard on this one and ill admit, the results are impressive! As much as ar all go back and fourth at times, dissagreeing with eachother over trivial shit, there's some bad ass and smart motherfuckers here!
 

Lota Fun

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It has filler metal added to it. Any moderate to high heat application would not use a fuse weld. JMO. :cool::up: A fuse would be straighter also. On one weld you pointed out it is not straight and you can see the varying amount of metal added.

Again, JMO.
 

WarpSpeed

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Re: Anyone know what this thing is? LABUSAS IS STUMPED*

I was thinking it could be a great big schnozzle for an industrial sized drum of Spray Cheese!
Spray cheese can 8" in diameter, 2 feet long packed with Cheddar goodness. This is the dispenser, none of you want to admit it since it's far more cool to think it's a part of some Flash Gordon rocket dealio. :-?

 

fredd

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Not giving up yet...

From a physics group I queried:

I'd say: these parts are intended to mix hot air from a combustion chamber (flowing inside) with cool diluting air (flowing outside). You see the shape meant to provide the maximum contact area between both fluxes so they mix quickly. Both fluxes would move upwards on the first picture.

I expect it in a normal gas turbine rather than a ramjet. The purpose is to provide an air temperature acceptable by the turbine, while the combustion need a higher temperature to be stable (more kerosene-to-air and slower air motion before adding the full flux).

An other reason, especially at early designs, was to protect the camber walls from heat, using a cold external flux.

From the design, it must be pretty old.

 

harryzx-12

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That is definetly GTAW gas tungsten arc welded / TIG. I have welded hundreds of hot section acft components while i was in the USAF.



I still think it's a custom butt plug for a feta cheese eatin uni brow cocksucker!
Or maybe not!
 

BusaVeloce

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That is definetly GTAW gas tungsten arc welded / TIG. I have welded hundreds of hot section acft components while i was in the USAF.



I still think it's a custom butt plug for a feta cheese eatin uni brow cocksucker!
Or maybe not!


Hello Harry!!!

How come I missed Your gapping whole that You supposedly have? It was tight for me...:eek: :( :D

My dick must be huge...:rotfl:
 

Lota Fun

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That is definetly GTAW gas tungsten arc welded / TIG. I have welded hundreds of hot section acft components while i was in the USAF.



I still think it's a custom butt plug for a feta cheese eatin uni brow cocksucker!
Or maybe not!

Absolutely TIG welded. The only point of contention was, is it fused or was filler metal used. I say filler metal was used and there are many reasons to back that up. A fuse weld for one is not generally accepted as a sound weld. Heat and vibration will cause it to fail.

My opinion is that it is a full pen weld with filler metal added. It's aerospace shit for fucks sakes, they don't fuck around when it comes to anything welded. Aerospace avoids welded pieces, that is the reason they use billet to make the wing spars and ribs and, and and....just about everything is made from billet, very few welded parts but there are a few.


And it might be a butt plug? :p:fu:
 
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FastGixx

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Hello Harry!!!

How come I missed Your gapping whole that You supposedly have? It was tight for me...:eek: :( :D

My dick must be huge...:rotfl:
Harry's dick is huge too.... The one in his fuckin mouth! :fu:

Harry quit shitting on my thread with your faggot fetish fantasy bullshit. I'll kick your fuckin old ass motherfucker..:lol2:
 

harryzx-12

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Don't make me fly to VA and stomp a mudhole in your ass!!:lol: Actually you'd have to loan me a ladder!:rotfl:



It's def got filler rod added to it.
 
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FastGixx

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Don't make me fly to VA so i can suck your dick and tongue your ass!!:lol: Actually i cant wait!:rotfl:



I want you to fill me with your big rod.


Harry you're a fucking faggot
 

fredd

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Through a contact at CALTECH:

One of our aeronautics professors responded with the following

It may be what he says, as I would guess, but I think it's a research item, and a bit quirky. It's probably not an operational piece,and I would guess it probably wasn't successful. If the fellow Wickman knows what it is, what's the problem?

ed. Wickman doesn't know....does Fastgixx know for sure what this is?
 
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FastGixx

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wait a minute. do you even know what the hell this thing is? or are you just giving us the runaround?
If I knew what the hell it was, I wouldn't have asked here!


Dude wants 50.00 for it if any of you want the fuckin thing. :lol:
 

fredd

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a late guess from a friend who is a self-taught engineer...

Now, down to gizmos!
I have no clue what this is! i have observed some of the cahracteristics and have a couple of guesses, hope it helps!
The shape does imply "shaping" a flow. The outer rosettes are are symmetrical but NOT axially indexed evenly. This implies either no concern for the indexing, or very careful concern... the degree of effort to build this would suggest that the indexing IS important. I can't imagine a fabricator not noticing the indexing error.
Second, the material is a high temperature material, but has not been exposed to extreme temperatures as indicated by the natural manufacturing colors. Either it has never been run, or the use of high quality stainless is for a different purpose. I suspect the former.
The ratio of surface to surface distances on the portals on the inside of the chambers to the exterior is roughly uniform, but not exact.
Flow characteristics from the main bell chanber and the rosette chambers is not laminar controlled. Just welded tubes at right angles and capped. ease of manufacturing, but again little concern for dynamic flow characteristics.
It is lightweight, and robustr in mechanical characteristics, and heat resistant.
My guess is that is is from a rocket motor. The injection nozzels for the oxidizer are shaped to improve the surface mixing characteristics of the propellenat and oxidizer. Thus, at some poiint the turbo-pump outlet must be flow-shaped prior to injection. Thus the manifold-injector will be very close to the combustion chamber, but not necissairly exposed directly. The flow of oxidizer (or propellenat) would act as a coolant. This might explain the lack of thermal dis-coloration of the stainless. But I do not believe it is actually part of the combustion process! I am guessing that the assembly is for pre-laminarization just prior to injection into the combustion chamber. Becaues of the relativly large flat areas of the inner core starr, the assembly cannot be used for very high pressure applications, implying roughly even pressure gradient between the inside and outside of the assembly. Thus, my guess that it is on the output of the turbo pump for the oxidizer, just prior to the injection portal of the combustion chamber.

That's why I work on computers, and am NOT a rocket scientist! I have little clue on how they really work...

my second guess was a cake decorator tip for a really big cake...

steve
 
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